Twitter Vine and My Marketing

Just when you thought you knew all there was to know about social media marketing, a new platform has arrived. Like other social media platforms, Vine can work to a marketer’s advantage if used purposefully and creatively.

BY: MEGAN WRIGHT ON MONDAY, MAY 06, 2013
Twitter Vine and My Marketing

Just when you thought you knew all there was to know about social media marketing, a new platform has arrived. Earlier this year, the video-sharing app Twitter Vine was released for iPhones and already has caught fire among companies, celebrities and college kids. Like other social media platforms, Vine can work to a marketer’s advantage if used purposefully and sprinkled with creativity.

What is Twitter Vine?

The short definition goes something like this: Twitter Vine is a dedicated app that allows registered users to create six-second looping videos. Though the app posts to Twitter accounts, users need to create a separate Vine account through their smartphone or computer. Like the original use for Twitter, Vine forces users to think creatively and concisely when developing content.

How Can I Use Twitter Vine in Marketing?

Similar to other visually-stimulating platforms, like YouTube and Instagram, there are already plenty of silly, impractical and bizarre Vine videos. The app has marketing potential, however. Most companies already know the benefits of corporate videos so using Vine should make sense.  Here are a few ways to leverage it:

  • Demonstrate your products. GoPro made a Vine video that was a natural fit for the platform. In just six seconds, the company successfully promotes its product and gives viewers something interesting. Vine is for more than video equipment though. Consider a series of videos that demonstrate the different features of a product as a social media campaign.

  • Feature services. Perhaps the selling point of your business is not a product at all, but is a service. Make a video of your employees performing that service, or of satisfied clients. Vine makes it easy to cut various footage together in a single six-second video, so consider a compilation of shots to best highlight your services.

  • Create interactive prompts. Use your six seconds to present a question that your followers can answer via Twitter. You could make the question about your industry, or simply ask a trivia question. If a particular prompt gets a strong response, consider making future Vine videos that are similar in style. Simon and Schuster creates a weekly Vine video on Fridays that asks followers what they plan to read over the weekend. The company takes it a step further by dropping clues as to what its employees plan to read as well.

  • Humanize your company. You probably have some photos on your website, blog and social media profiles that give current and potential clients a little bit of insight into who you are as a business owner. Consider a Vine video a step up – sort of like Instagram, times six. Create individual video introductions for your employees, or special messages for holidays. Tropicana used a Vine video, and a play on words, to wish fans a Happy #Valenvine’s Day. Show that while you take your business very seriously, you know how to have fun too.

Innovation in marketing is essential when it comes to small business success. Consumers and clients have come to expect creativity when it comes to promoting your products or services, making injecting fun into marketing something of the norm. Now run-of-the-mill marketing often goes unnoticed, no matter how well-planned and executed. Take advantage of the latest social media trends, like Twitter Vine, to maximize the reach of your marketing campaigns.

Have you made a Vine video yet? Share the link with us below.

About the Author

Megan Wright

Megan Wright is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. As a small business expert, Megan specializes in reporting the latest business news, helpful tips and reliable resources, as well as providing small business advice.

Full Biography