How to Recruit Top Talent as a Growing Business

You often hear business owners say how hard it is to find good employees. Learn top tips to find talent as a growing business.

BY: RICHARD BERTCH ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 09, 2019
How to Recruit Top Talent as a Growing Business

In the not-so-distant-past, you could post a job opening on your website or job board and wait for qualified applicants to come to you. You could sort through resumes and select a few promising candidates to interview and make your selection. You know those days are long gone.

Unemployment is at record lows. There’s a shortage of people with the skills you need. Great talent is at an all-time premium. In fact, 45 percent of companies say they can’t find people with the skills they need. 67 percent of large organizations are reporting talent shortages.

We’ve all read stories about incredible perks startups and rapid growth industries are offering to attract top tier candidates – things such as onsite haircuts, laundry, and game rooms, pet care, yoga classes, and gourmet meals. This is on top of eye-popping salaries and generous benefits.

So, what do you do if you don’t have a budget to offer these perks?

Do Your Research

You can find out a lot about what people hate about their current jobs (and possibly even their current employers) by doing a simple online search. Start by going to your favorite search engine and type in the job title with the words “workplace complaints.” You’ll find a wealth of information at your fingertips.

If you target candidates from specific companies, check out websites like Glassdoor that offer anonymous reviews about companies by employees. If you’re looking for a specific skill set, search by job title or industry. Industry websites and forums provide good fodder for finding the things employees hate.

If you can find out what employees dislike about their industry or current employer, you can use this information to help frame your recruiting efforts. If people are sick of long hours, you can tout nights and weekends off. If people are tired of working without any feedback, you can offer quarterly reviews and bonuses.

Consider Your Real Business Needs

Ask yourself if you have flexibility in the way you approach work in the current environment. Here are a few examples of things to consider:

Remote Work

Do you really need people to be in your office every day to get the jobs done? Consider allowing remote work. Online tools allow for many jobs to be done from home or at other locations. This opens up your talent pool by expanding outside of your immediate geographic location and may attract a completely different group of applicants.

Job Sharing

Many companies are finding success with job sharing. Sharing full-time job duties and compensation across two part-time workers can be an especially attractive situation for young parents or skilled workers that don’t want a full-time commitment but have the skills you need.

Outsourcing or Freelance

Hiring freelancers gives you a way to find people with demonstrated skill sets to handle specific projects. It gives you a way to test people out before hiring them on full time. It can help you quickly ramp up as business expands or scale down when demand eases.

Always Be On The Lookout

Your business growth depends on finding, recruiting, and retaining the talent you need to drive your business. Don’t wait until you have openings. You need to always be in recruiting mode.

Don’t Forget The Talent You Have

Finally, don’t take the talent you already have for granted. Turnover takes a big toll on companies, especially startups and rapid growth companies. When you find someone good, do whatever you can to keep them happy and productive.

About the Author

Richard Bertch

Richard is a contributing finance author at ChamberofCommerce.com and freelance writer about all things business, finance and productivity. With over 10 years of copywriting experience, Richard has worked with brands ranging from Quickbooks to Oracle creating insightful whitepapers, conversion focused product pages and thought leadership blog posts. Richard can be reached at richardbertch@gmail.com.

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